An Artist Whose Works.Are Intended To Be Understood As Sheet.Music Out of Thin Air Came A Key Ingredient That Made Beer

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Out of Thin Air Came A Key Ingredient That Made Beer

To varying degrees, craft beer drinkers are essentially ‘East Prospectors’. We are always looking for new or unique flavors of beer that come from yeasts they don’t know about. Many people are unaware of yeast’s role in producing flavor, appearance and aroma. Yeast contributes in large part to the unique taste and aroma that give each craft beer its unique stylistic character. The maxim is: no yeast, no beer. This does not detract from the fact that barley and hops are also important.

If there is one word that makes the craft beer industry unique, it is innovation. Craft brewers think outside the box. Some brewers are carving out a niche by experimenting with “promising” wild/natural yeasts. These are yeast strains that have been “surveyed” directly from nature. And yeast strains literally collected/harvested from trees, plants, fruits, etc.

Using wild yeast is clearly a risk, as the brewer is not sure what the beer will look like after fermentation is complete. But this is a risk in yeast exploration and innovation. But this doesn’t stop researchers from looking to wild yeasts for new commercially viable yeasts. It’s all about understanding the flavor and performance of different yeasts.

The reason we mention wild yeast upfront is because that’s how beer came into being naturally about 10,000 years ago. Today there are brewers who have revived this art form and specialize exclusively in wild yeast beer . Minnesota’s Wild Minds Ale started their brewery by researching/collecting yeast strains from various wild fruit bushes, trees, and wildflowers. They wanted a unique, wild flavor from the wild yeasts used in saisons, farmhouses and sour beers.

“The beauty of wild isolated strains is that they are both truly local and unique,” ​​says James Howat, co-founder of Black Project Spontaneous & Wild Ales in Denver. Plus, “yeast is how breweries set themselves apart,” says Eric Lumen, co-founder of Green Room Brewing. “Although all breweries can use roughly the same raw materials, wild yeast can give the product a unique and interesting flavor.”

Yes, there are innovations with wild yeast. The latest new yeast development was announced in his June 2020 by innovative yeast maker Lallemand. This new patented yeast is named Wildbrew Philly Sour with the technical name GY7b. This strain was originated by a student of Brewing Science Director Matthew Farber, Dr. This yeast strain was discovered as part of a project. This new yeast is one of over 500 yeast strains for beer. According to Soft School, there are thousands of varieties in all.

This new yeast has many advantages in producing beers with unique flavors and aromas in the sour beer category. It’s a great discovery.

Philly Sour is now sold to homebrewers and brewers around the world. “Philly sours reduce brewing time to make sour beer because the yeast itself produces lactic acid. Contamination concerns because for the first time the brewer does not have to introduce bacteria into the sour beer production line. is avoided, and it tastes better,” says Dr. Farber.

As an aside, sour beer has been around for 1000 years, but has only grown in popularity in recent decades. In fact, some breweries only produce sour beer.

This discovery shows how simple living cells that are as old as time itself produce beer. “Beer has been produced as a fermented beverage for over 5,000 years. It wasn’t until Louis Pasteur isolated the yeast cells in the late 1860s that the ancient mystery of fermentation was unraveled,” Global Technical said. adviser Eric Abbott said. For production of Lallemann yeast. “Before the discovery of Pasteur, brewers accepted that the wort somehow began to grow a foamy substance that made a delicious drink. We sell yeast to brewers with specific specifications regarding compatibility with hop requirements.”

So what is yeast and why would craft beer consumers want to know a little more about it? First, beer without yeast is just sugar water. Simply put, yeast is a single-celled living organism, a tiny but living organism. It likes warm temperatures and humidity, and needs oxygen and plenty of food. Yeast’s nutrient source is supplied by the starch of malted grains that are heated in water to release sugars. to produce alcohol and carbon dioxide. Ultimately, the selected yeast strain eats up the sugar, releasing alcohol and her CO2. Brings out the best in hops and malts.

But how small are yeast cells? If a homebrewer is doing batches, or a large brewer is testing a recipe, 5-10 grams of yeast may be needed. A 5 gallon bag of dry yeast for fermentation contains approximately 150 billion cells for ale and 300 billion cells for lager. A 5-gram pouch of dry yeast contains approximately 150 billion cells.

Consumers appreciate the alcohol strength, visual appeal, flavor, aroma, and mouthfeel of the final craft beer product. All of these are facilitated by yeast. The type of yeast used determines the characteristics of the particular beer style brewed. Even yeast contributes to the “head” of beer.

Here are some of the yeast by-products that impact consumers: Yeast produces esters, ketones and phenols in the process of consuming sugars. To get a signature craft beer, the brewer needs to spoil the yeast. Pampering involves creating the right fermentation temperature, introducing the right amount of the right yeast, creating the right water chemistry, and having the right sugars for the particular yeast to render the desired style of beer. This includes putting it in juice.

  • ester – These create a fruity flavor. Interestingly, if you want to ferment more esters at a higher temperature.
  • Ketone – These compounds add a buttery or caramel flavor to beer.
  • Phenols – A compound that produces the spicy aroma common to wine.
  • Alcohol – Some alcohols can add stress to yeast performance during fermentation, but alcohol contributes to aroma and mouthfeel.

  • Foam/Foam Retention (referred to as foam) – The choice of yeast to help produce foam in beer is important.

Bruz Beer’s Charlie Gottenkieny said: It is therefore clear that the process of turning sugar water into beer must always be controlled. Making craft beer is quite a brain teaser and not an “easy thing”.

The American Homebrewers Association points out: It can dry out the beer and leave it with a strong bitter taste. ”

Yeast manufacturers also publish detailed data sheets for each yeast. These specs provide brewers pitching speed, fermentation time, temperature, decay rate, aggregation data and of course aroma data. The flavor and aroma wheels shown below are provided by the manufacturer so brewers can visualize the suitability of a particular yeast for a beer style.

Each yeast house offers a wide variety of strains. There are places where the culture overlaps, but there are also unique strains cultivated independently by each company. Therefore, it is impossible to say who will offer the largest selection. But Lallemand seems to be focusing on yeast and flavor innovation.

While doing research for this article, I watched a webinar on “Biotransformation” hosted by Lallemand Brewing on November 12, 2020. In addition to the Lallemand Brewing scientists, Dr. Thomas Shellhammer gave a presentation describing new discoveries and analysis of his Lallemand yeast products designed to enhance hop flavors and aromas in the brewing process. (Note: Dr. Schellhammer is the Western Norwegian Professor of Fermentation Sciences at Oregon State University and an internationally recognized expert in hop chemistry. In his lab, beer flavor, foam, physical and I am studying the contribution of hops to flavor stability.)

The webinar presented new yeast research dedicated to a new approach to craft beer brewing called biotransformation. Biotransformation is defined as the chemical modification that an organism (yeast) makes to a compound (derived from hop oil). These findings also have implications for casual craft beer enthusiasts, as they recognize new interactions between hop compounds and yeast strains that create “new” aromatic compounds. It is initiated by yeast enzymes that work with certain hop compounds. Craft beer consumers should be prepared for new aromas and flavors coming from hoppy IPAs.

Yeast influences the hop character of beer. This is something every beer consumer knows and appreciates. This new research is beginning to revolutionize the way some craft brewers think about how the yeasts they choose for their beer react with hop compounds, and vice versa. Hops have non-aromatic compounds, but with certain yeast strains, unique yeast enzymes can release new aromas/flavors from the beer’s hop compounds.

For craft beer “hopheads,” this means that “different yeast strains can affect flavor and aroma by interacting with flavor compounds derived from specific hops.

Benefits derived from this new yeast enzyme research include:

  • Increased variety of hop flavors and aromas,

  • Suppresses unpleasant bitterness and enhances the mouthfeel and drinkability of beer,

  • It uses less sophisticated hop varieties while still giving more character to the consumer beer.

Interestingly, some EU breweries have started labeling specific yeast strains and hop varieties used in their beers as part of a new approach to beer branding.

There is some crossover in yeast research between wine and beer.Dr. Shellhammer received his PhD from UC Davis, where he did his research. With greater transparency in craft beer labeling, consumers will be informed and educated about beer brands and styles. Consumers will benefit from new flavors and aromas when it comes to exploring new yeasts from the wild/open environment, or exploring new ways of introducing yeast into the hops used for fermentation. There is a lot of online information available for consumers who want to learn more about the yeast used to make their beer. The “flavor wheel” above is an example of the information available.

With so much advanced research specific to beer science underway around the world, keep exploring new craft beer ingredients and brewing techniques.

cheers!

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